Entertainment Weekly is all over the final “Hunger Games” movie.

It’s time to say goodbye to The Girl on Fire. Part political allegory, part family saga, the Hunger Games franchise has already generated over $2.3 billion, proving that young adult adaptations can be substantive, and — most of all — that a blockbuster action-hero doesn’t need to have a Y chromosome.

But as much as these movies have influenced Hollywood (and millions of global fans), their greatest impact has been on their three leads: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, and Liam Hemsworth. They each entered the Games as relative unknowns, as wary of celebrity as Katniss was of the Capitol. But through the years, the actors — most notably now Oscar-winner Lawrence — have matured into major movie stars and have come to terms with the power of fame. “Jennifer realized at a certain point, that if people are going to be listening to you, you’d better have something to say,” says series producer Nina Jacobson.

The fourth and final installment, Mockingjay – Part 2 (out Nov. 20) opens in District 13. The propaganda campaign that filled most of Mockingjay – Part 1 has been predominantly successful with the exception of President Snow (Donald Sutherland) punishing Katniss by brainwashing her partner in crime Peeta Mellark (Hutcherson) before sending him back to District 13 to kill her. Part 2 opens with Katniss in a neck brace, recovering from Peeta’s Tracker-Jacker induced attack, and contemplating how she will enact her revenge on Snow. Meanwhile, under the watchful eye of President Coin (Julianne Moore), the rebels — including Gale Hawthorne (Hemsworth) — are making last preparations for their mission to topple the Capitol once and for all. It’s been a long run-up to the final battle, which finds the three leads, their camera crew and a few key allies engaged in warfare inside the booby-trapped hub of Panem. Returning director Francis Lawrence promises it won’t disappoint. “When you get to the end, you just feel the entire history of what these characters have been through,” he says. “It’s part of what makes this movie all the more satisfying.”